LESSON 1: SCALES

Each scale is made from a series of whole steps & half steps. These patterns will remain the same regardless of the key signature. It may help to say & play the patterns until you have mastered them. This will be most helpful when playing melodic lines on any instrument with a keyboard. Start to exercise these patterns slowly. The more proficient you become, the more you should increase your speed. Do not hesitate to change the root note with every scale progression completed accurately. Work towards doing the best you can, every time you play! I look forward to seeing you next lesson!

Major Scale Pattern
Root-Whole Step- Whole Step-Half Step- Whole Step- Whole Step- Whole Step- Half Step

Minor Scale Pattern
Root- Whole Step- Half Step- Whole Step- Whole Step- Half Step- Whole Step- Whole Step

Harmonic Minor Scale Pattern
Root- Whole Step- Half Step- Whole Step- Whole Step- Half Step- 1 1/2 Steps- Half Step

Melodic Minor Scale Pattern
(ascending or going up)
Root- Whole Step- Half Step- Whole Step- Whole Step- Whole Step- Whole Step- Half Step

(descending or going down)
Root- Whole Step- Whole Step- Half Step- Whole Step- Whole Step- Half Step- Whole Step

Lesson 2:  The Musical Alphabet

There are only seven letters in The Music Alphabet, A-B-C-D-E-F-G. Each of these letters have the ability to be raised (made sharp-#) or lowered (made flat-b). When you raise or lower any letter in The Music Alphabet, you are playing a note that is between two notes. You will probably remember this “half” concept from Lesson 1: Scales. There may be someone out there who wants to know why should they learn scales before they learn music notes. The answer is simple. Now that you have a functioning knowledge of scale patterns, you can begin replacing your whole step/half step patterns with actual music notes.
Here is a chart you can use to study each music note & the notes that act as the halfway point between two notes.

SHARP NOTES
A# C# D# F# G#
A B C D E F G

FLAT NOTES
Ab Bb Db Eb Gb
A B C D E F G

Lesson 3: Set The Mood

When you are playing in different keys (i.e. playing scale patterns using different root notes😳) you can spice things up by playing CHORDS with your scales. Let’s use the key of C as an example. To locate the note C on a keyboard you should first put two fingers on the two black keys. Next put one finger on the black key on the left, this note is C SHARP (C#). Finally go to the key directly to the left of C#, (LOWER A HALF STEP) this note is C. To play a chord you only need to strike two or more notes at the same time. ONE-SKIP-TWO-SKIP-THREE is a simple statement you can use to remember a three note chord. This tells you to play one note, skip a note, play the next note, skip the note after that, then finally add the final note to the chord. All three notes should be played at the same time.
Start at C playing your ONE-SKIP-TWO-SKIP-THREE pattern up then down THE KEY OF C. Here are the types of chords you are playing:
1. MAJOR 2. MINOR 3. MINOR 4. MAJOR 5. MAJOR 6. MINOR 7. DIMINISHED 8. MAJOR

8 & 1 should always sound like the same note because they are eight notes apart (A OCTAVE).

 

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